Q & A Centre

Got a question about Births, Deaths and Marriages in Ireland? On this Q & A page we have listed the most commonly asked questions from the public - and the answers.

Adoption

Adoption In Ireland?

Domestic Legal Adoption was first introduced in the Republic of Ireland under the 1952 Adoption Act. The 1952 Act was enacted on 1 January 1953.

Domestic adoption refers to a child born in the Republic of Ireland and adopted in Ireland.

If you would like to order an Adoptive Birth Certificate for an adoption AFTER the 1 January 1953 please click here.

Prior to the 1952 Adoption Act, children were 'boarded out' which would be similar to fostering now or they were informally 'adopted'.

In many cases, these 'adoptions' were arranged privately so there were no records kept.

In other situations, the 'adoption' was arranged by orphanages or Mother and Baby Homes.

To obtain a Birth Certificate for an adoptive birth BEFORE the 1 January 1953 contact the Adoption Authority of Ireland for assistance www.aai.gov.ie/

Domestic Adoption in Ireland now includes four distinct categories:

  • Step Family Adoption
  • Extended Family/Relative Adoption
  • Domestic Infant Adoption
  • Long-Term Foster Care to Adoption

Inter-country Adoption – Adopting a child born in another country and bringing the child to Ireland to be brought up by adoptive parents

Inter-country adoption was given a statutory basis in 1991 with the passing of the Adoption Act in that year and the most recent legislation in this area which is the Adoption Act 2010.

Adoption Birth Certificate?

An Adoptive Birth Certificate for a Domestic Adoption from Ireland can be ordered from this site HERE (link to our adoption order page).

To order a Adoptive Birth Certificate from an InterCountry Adoption please visit the Adoption Authority of Ireland website: https://www.aai.gov.ie/

How can I trace my Birth Parents?

If you were adopted in Ireland or from outside Ireland by Irish parents and are seeking to trace your birth parents please contact the Adoption Authority of Ireland for advice: www.aai.gov.ie

Births

How to order your Irish Birth Certificate by Post?

If you wish to order your certificate by post, download the form below and send it to our office along with the correct fee for the number of certificates required and the postal rate. 


All payments should be in Euros and cheques / postal orders made
payable to Civil Certificates Ltd.

Application form for Irish Birth Certificates. 


Click here  (PDF)
or 
Click Here  (Microsoft Word)

Post application forms to:-

Civil Certificates Ltd.
6 - 9 Trinity Street
Dublin 2
D02 EY47
Ireland

 

What information is on a Birth Certificate?

The content of a Birth Certificate in the Republic of Ireland has changed over the decades to reflect social change and so the content of your Birth Certificate depends on when you were born.

If you were born BEFORE the 1 October 1997 your Birth Certificate will include the following details:

  • Your Forename/s
  • No Surname
  • Your Date of Birth
  • Place of Birth
  • Your Father's Name and Address
  • Your Mother's Name and Maiden Name if Married
  • Your Father's Occupation
  • Signature of Informant (Person who registered your birth)
  • Date of Registration of the Birth
  • Signature of the Birth Registrar

Anyone born BEFORE the 1 October 1997 in the Rep of Ireland does not have a surname on their birth certificate. It is assumed the child took their father's surname if he is listed on the Birth Certificate but anyone born before this date is legally entitled to use their father's surname, their mother's maiden name if married OR a combination of both surnames.

If you were born AFTER 1 October 1997 - which was when the 1996 Legitimacy Act was enacted assigning a surname to all born in the State on or after this date - your Birth Certificate will list your SURNAME from Birth, along with your Mother's Address and Occupation.

On the 1 April 2004 the State introduced a national computerised system for Births and Deaths registered in the Republic of Ireland. From this date forward the Birth Certificate now included any surnames previously used by the parents prior to the birth registration, and both parents mother's maiden names for genealogical purposes. The entry would be signed by the parents of the child.

What is a Long Form Birth Certificate?

A "Long" Form Birth Certificate  refers not to length or size of a Birth Certificate but to its content. A long form or "full" birth certificate contains a person's name, date of birth, place of birth, and their parents details at the time of the birth of the child.

What is a Short Birth Certificate?

A Short Birth Certificate contains a person's name, date of birth and place of birth only. These certificates were approximately A5 in size but are no longer issued by the State following the instruction of a new format of Birth Certificate in Ireland in 2004 following computerisation of State Birth, Death and Marriage Records.

Short Birth Certificates are no longer accepted for official purposes e.g. passport application.

How to Register a Birth?

For newborn babies, the birth can be registered at ANY Civil Registration Office in the Republic of Ireland regardless of where the birth took place in the Republic of Ireland.

Parent/s should bring current valid picture ID (Passport/Driver’s Licence) and be able to confirm their PPS Numbers.

Additional documents may be needed depending on the parent/s marital status.

Parents have up to 12 months to register the birth, but if the birth is registered within the first six months the Dept of Social Protection will automatically arrange the family Children’s Allowance payment.

Married Parents

For married parents, only ONE parent needs to attend to register the birth, HOWEVER both parents can attend TOGETHER to register the birth if BOTH wish to sign the birth entry.

If parents were married OUTSIDE the Republic of Ireland, they will need to bring their Civil Marriage Certificate from the country they married in to the Civil Registration Office when registering the birth.

They will also need to present a translation of the marriage certificate by a certified Translator or a translation agency if the certificate is not in English or multi-lingual.

Single Parent(s)

If the parents of a child are not married to each other, BOTH parents will need to attend together to register the birth.

If the Father is not to be named, the Mother of the child can attend by herself to register the birth. The Birth Certificate will only list the mother’s details and the child can only assigned the Mother’s surname.

When registering the birth jointly, the parents will be asked to complete two forms, a CRA9 and a Mutual Consent Form. The MCF is completed by the parents and confirms the surname that the parents are agreeing to assign to their child.

The surname of the child, can be the Mother’s, the Father’s, OR a combination of both.

This surname CAN NEVER be altered unless the parents of the child marry each OTHER at a later date.

The surname cannot be changed if there is ANY OTHER change in the relationship of the parents of the child with each other (e.g. the parents relationship breaks up)

If the parents wish to use a surname that is part of their family history, or a reflection of the applicants cultural or national identity it may require the authorisation of the General Registrar’s Office.

Please be aware for single parents, sole guardianship of the child resides with the Mother even if the Father is named on the Birth Certificate.

If for some reason, only one parent is available to attend to register the birth, forms giving legal consent to the ONE parent to REGISTER the birth can be issued to the parents by your local Civil Registration Office.

Please be aware that the form completed by the parent who will be ABSENT when the birth is registered, will have to be signed in the presence of a Peace Commissioner, Commissioner of Oaths or a Solicitor.

Divorced/Separated Mother

If the mother of a newborn baby comes under any of above listed civil status categories, she should contact the Registrar at their local Civil Registration Office BEFORE attending to register their baby’s birth.

This aspect of Birth Registration can be an emotive subject for some parents, but the Registrar is bound by the Civil Registration Act of 2004 to seek certain legal documents when registering the birth of a baby whose mother’s civil status is listed above.

If the mother of a newborn baby is Divorced from a previous Marriage she will need to bring her Final Divorce Decree to the Civil Registration Office.

The Final Decree MUST be issued by the Court a minimum of 10 MONTHS prior to the Birth of the baby.

If the Divorce Decree is not from an Irish Court, and not in English, the Mother of the Baby will ALSO need to bring a translation of this legal document from a certified translation agency to the Civil Registration Office.

If a Mother of a newborn baby is LEGALLY SEPARATED from her ex-husband - who is NOT the father of her child - she will need to bring her Legal Separation Agreement to the Civil Registration Office when registering the birth. The Separation Agreement will need to be more than 10 MONTHS old prior to the birth of the baby.

If a Mother of a Child is NOT legally separated or divorced from her ex-husband for 10 months prior to the birth of her baby, she has two options in registering her baby’s birth:

The Mother can be issued a CRA7 FORM by the Civil Registration Office which can be signed by her ex-husband in the presence of his Solicitor, or a Peace Commissioner or a Commissioner for Oaths, which states he is NOT the Father of the child (Rebuts Paternity). This can be presented when registering the birth.

OR

The mother, and the biological father of the child, can apply jointly to the Family Law Court to obtain a Guardianship Order under Section 6A of the Family Law of 1967 to name the biological father (her partner) as a Guardian of the child.

The couple should bring the resulting COURT ORDER with them when attending to register their child’s birth.

Widowed Mother

If the mother of a child was previously married, and is now widowed, and her late husband was NOT the father of her child, she will need to bring her late husband’s Death Certificate to the Civil Registration Office.

This confirms that her late husband was not the father of the child, and no claim of paternity can be later made by his estate or kin.

Deadline for Registering A Birth

If the birth is NOT registered after 12 months parents will need to apply for the Late Registration of a Birth which requires the agreement of the Superintendent Registrar and completion of Statutory Declaration which must be signed in the presence of a Peace Commissioner, Commissioner of Oaths or a Solicitor.

How to add a Forename to a Birth Certificate?

A forename can be added, amended or altered on a Birth Record or Birth Certificate by a parent of a child.

The application form to alter the forename on a child's birth certificate can be obtained at your local Civil Registration Office and should ideally be signed by both parents to confirm both parents consent to the alteration.

However the form must be submitted with documentary evidence of use of the forename in its new form, or the forenames been added.

Two pieces of documentary evidence are needed and can include a Baptismal Certificate or other religious record, a crèche, pre-school or primary school record, or a letter from a Medical Doctor whom the child is registered with as a patient. Evidence of current usage will also need to be provided and can include a passport, medical card, or bank/credit union account.

 

How do you correct an error on a Birth Certificate?

An error on a Birth Certificate can only be corrected by either parent of the person named on the birth certificate or in the absence of the parents, an older sibling or relative. You cannot apply to alter your own birth record. An application form to "Correct An Error of Fact or Substance on a Birth Certificate" can be obtained from your local Civil Registration Office and once completed and signed in the presence of a Solicitor, Peace Commissioner or Commissioner for Oaths can be submitted with two pieces of documentary evidence proving the error to your local Civil Registration Office to be approved by the Regional Superintendent Registrar.

In  the absence or unavailability of parent/s, older siblings or a relative to act as the applicant to correct an error on a birth record, please contact the General Register's Office at 1890-252-076 for advice on this matter.

How to apply for the Late Registration of a Birth?

Parents have 12 months to register a birth. If parents have missed this decline they will have to apply for the Late Registration of a Birth. The local Civil Registration Office will supply the parents with the necessary application form and this should be completed and signed in the presence of a Solicitor, Peace Commissioner or a Commissioner of Oaths. The application will also need to include proof of the Birth taking place and should be accompanied with a letter from the Hospital were the birth occurred confirming the birth details. If the parents are deceased, an older sibling or relative can apply for the late registration of the birth. In the absence of any of these informants, the person should contact the General Register's Office for advised on how to apply in such a case.

How to add a Father’s details to a Birth Certificate?

Where the mother and father are in joint agreement to add the father's details to a birth certificate, the parents can apply jointly with an application form available from your local Civil Registration Office to re-register the birth of their child.

The child can be assigned the father's surname, the mother's or a combination of both. The forms must be completed and signed by both parents in the presence of a witness and submitted to their local Civil Registration Office for approval by the Regional Superintendent Registrar. Both parents will be requested to attend their local office to complete the re-registration of the birth, sign the new entry and be issued with new birth certificates.

Where the mother is applying to add a father's details to a birth certificate without the father's consent, she will need to submit a Court Order naming the man as the father of the child along with a prescribed form from the local Civil Registration Office for approval by the Regional Superintendent Registrar. In such an application the resulting birth certificate will name the father of the child - however the child will be only able to carry the mother's surname.

A Father can apply to have his details added to his child's birth certificate. The applicant would need to submit a Court Order naming him as the father of the child along with a completed and signed prescribed form from the local Civil Registration Office for approval by the Regional Superintendent Registrar. The SR will write to the mother advising her of receipt of the application and the time span for when the new birth registration will be affected. In such a resulting birth certificate, the father's details will be listed on the certificate but the child will retain the mother's surname.

Where the father of the child is deceased, and the mother of the child wishes to apply to add the father's details to the birth record, the mother should contact the General Register's Office for legal advice on this matter

How to remove a Father's details from a Birth Certificate?

The father's details on a birth certificate can only ever be removed if it can proved the person named as the father of the child on the birth certificate is NOT the father of the child.

The evidence must take the form of DNA testing proving the paternity of the child lies with another person.

There are strict regulations on the quality of DNA testing accepted and enquires should be made with the General Register's Office whose advice, participation and authorisation will be needed through the process.

Certificates

What is an Official Certificate?

An Official Certificate is printed on official State Certificate paper for life events. This paper is green in colour and has a number of security features to prevent fraudulent duplication of the certificate and carries a "HARP" watermark through the paper.  ALL Birth, Death, Marriage, Civil Partnership and Adoption certificates are printed on this paper.

Civil Marriage

What is Civil Marriage?

Civil Marriage is a marriage ceremony conducted solely by a HSE State Marriage Registrar. Civil Marriages can take place in a Registry Office or in a Hotel or Public Venue or outdoors in a location attached to a venue. There is usually one Registry Office located in each county.

Civil Ceremonies do not contain religious or spiritual content but along with declarations of no impediment to marriage and the exchange of vows required by law by the couple, they can include personal vows between the couple, a ring exchange, readings of poetry and prose, candle ceremonies, and music amongst other additions.

To book a civil wedding in a Registry Office - or a Hotel/Public Venue/or outdoors in a location attached in to a venue -  you will need to call your local Civil Registration Office to book your wedding date and appointment to complete all the necessary paperwork a minimum of 3 months in advance of the wedding.

Civil Partnership

What is Civil Partnership?

Civil Partnership in Ireland was available to same sex couples only between 2011 and 18 November 2016 as such couples were prohibited from marrying under the then existing marriage legislation.

From the 18 November 2016 marriage equality legislation was enacted in the Republic of Ireland and marriage became available to all couples regardless of their sexuality or gender and civil partnership ceased to be available in the State.

How to order a Civil Partnership Certificate?

If you had a civil partnership in the Republic of Ireland and would like to order your Civil Partnership Certificate please call our office to order your certificate or over the phone at 01-6190235.

Coroner

A Death has been referred to a Coroner – how do I get a Death Certificate?

A death is referred to a Coroner if someone dies suddenly or unexpectedly or violently or if their body is found after death.

You can contact the Corner directly if you are next of kin of the deceased for advice on when the death will be registered.

The contact details of all Coroner's in the Republic of Ireland can be obtained from their website:
http://www.coroners.ie/en/COR/Pages/CoronerContactDetails

The Coroner upon investigation may register the death OR request a post-mortem and register the death OR hold an inquest which usually takes place a number of months after the death.

In such a situation a Coroner can issue the next of kin an Interim Death Certificate until the inquest is held whereupon the Coroner will then register the death with the local Civil Registration Office.

Deaths

How to order your Irish Death Certificate by Post?

If you wish to order your certificate by post, download the form below and send it to our office along with the correct fee for the number of certificates required and the postal rate. 

All payments should be in Euros and cheques / postal orders made 
payable to Civil Certificates Ltd.

Application form for Irish Death Certificates. 


Click here  (PDF) 
or 
Click Here  (Microsfot Word)

Post application forms to:-

Civil Certificates Ltd.
6 - 9 Trinity Street
Dublin 2
D02 EY47
Ireland

 

How do I register a Death?

To register a death you will need a Death Notification Form

A Death Notification Form is issued to the next of kin by the Hospital, Hospice or Nursing Home where the deceased passed away.

When you obtain this form you should complete the details on the back of the form which relate to the deceased. However you only SIGN the back of the Form when you are in the presence of the Registrar when you attend the local Civil Registration Office to register the death.

You will need to bring current picture ID for yourself to the office when attending to register the death.

Who can Register a Death?

A Death is usually and preferably registered by a family member or relative of the deceased.

This can include the deceased's spouse, offspring, siblings,  in-laws, or a niece/nephew etc.

If a death has not been registered by a family member/relative after 3 months the death can be registered by anyone present at the death, an authorised staff member from the building or institute where the person passed away OR an undertaker, OR a person who found the body of the person concerned, OR a person who procured the disposal of that body OR any other person who has knowledge of the death.

How do I apply for the Late Registration of a Death?

If a death has not been registered after 12 months after the death an applicant will have to apply for the late registration of a death.

The local Civil Registration Office will supply you with the application form which you must complete and then SIGN in the presence of a Solicitor, Peace Commissioner or a Commissioner for Oaths.

The form will need to be accompanied by a Death Notification Form supplied by the deceased's Medical Doctor and one piece of documentary evidence.

In the absence of a Death Notification Form the applicant will need to submit the application form along with two pieces of documentary evidence which can include a newspaper Death Notice, a Memorial Card and/or a picture of the gravestone of the deceased.

The form and documentary evidence should be submitted to the Regional Superintendent Registrar for approval at your local Civil Registration Office.

How do I correct an error on a Death Certificate?

If you notice an error on a Death Certificate you can apply to correct the error.

The local Civil Registration Office will supply you with the relevant application form and  you should complete the form and sign it in the presence of a Solicitor, Peace Commissioner or a Commissioner for Oaths.

You will need to submit the completed form with documentary evidence proving the error to your local Civil Registration Office for approval by the Regional Superintendent Registrar.

A Death has been referred to a Coroner?

A death is referred to a Coroner if someone dies suddenly or unexpectedly or violently or if their body is found after death.

You can contact the Corner directly if you are next of kin of the deceased for advice on when the death will be registered.

The contact details of all Coroner's in the Republic of Ireland can be obtained from their website:
Email address for Regional Coroners

The Coroner upon investigation may register the death OR request a post-mortem and register the death OR hold an inquest which usually takes place a number of months after the death.

In such a situation a Coroner can issue the next of kin an Interim Death Certificate until the inquest is held whereupon the Coroner will then register the death with the local Civil Registration Office.

Dead Poll

How do I apply to change my name by Deed Poll?

To change your name by Deed Poll you can apply on our website through our Deed Poll page HERE

Once you apply online we will send you your official legally binding Change of Name Deed Poll.

To make your Deed Poll legally valid you must SIGN the Deed in the presence of your WITNESS in the presence of a Commissioner for Oaths/Solicitor who will also sign it. 

Once this is complete your Change of Name Deed Poll is complete

You can - but are not legally obliged - to lodge your Deed Poll with the High Court. It costs €60 to do this and your name is added to Register of Deed Polls.

It is worth noting that if you complete a Deed Poll to change your name, you cannot use it to change your Birth Certificate.

In future contact with government/official/financial bodies you will need to present your Birth Certificate AND your Deed Poll to prove your new identity.

Can I change my child’s name by Deed Poll?

Yes.  For children under 14 years of age the parents can apply to alter their child's name by Deed Poll.

Children aged 14-17 can apply to alter their own name by Deed Poll but need the written consent of their parents

Once someone is aged 18 they are deemed legally as an adult and so can apply without any parental involvement.

More information is available from our Deed Poll order page HERE

Fees

What is your fee for a Birth Certificate?

The State charge for all Civil Certificates in the Republic of Ireland is €20.00.

Our express dispatch service which ensures your certificate is issued & dispatched within 48 Hours of your order costs €16.50 (excl. VAT).

This site also allows you to order from the State Service with a delivery time ranging up to 14 working days depending on demand.

Advice on Family Tree Research?

To start your Family Tree Research the most reliable site to start from is www.irishgenealogy.ie

This free government site allows you to search Irish Birth, Death and Marriage records from 1864 to 1950’s approximately.

The site also clearly and simply outlines the other genealogy resources you can access FREE online, including wills, transportation records, school records plus church, property and military records, etc.

The site has an introductory module that is an excellent overview of online research www.irishgenealogy.ie

Marriages

How to order your Irish Marriage Certificate by Post?

If you wish to order your certificate by post, download the form below and send it to our office along with the correct fee for the number of certificates required and the postal rate. 


All payments should be in Euros and cheques / postal orders made 
payable to Civil Certificates Ltd.

Application form for Irish Marriage Certificates. 


Click here  (PDF) 
or 
Click Here  (Microsoft Word)

Post application forms to:-

Civil Certificates Ltd.
6 - 9 Trinity Street
Dublin 2
D02 EY47
Ireland

How do I apply to get married?

If you wish to marry in the Republic of Ireland, both parties to the wedding must attend together by appointment, a Civil Registration Office a minimum of 3 months in advance of the wedding to serve notice to the State of their intention to marry. This is required under the Civil Registration Act of 2004.

You can attend more than 3 months in advance of the wedding and this is always recommended by Civil Registration staff.

At the meeting, the Registrar will issue the couple with a Marriage Registration Form which must be signed on the day of the wedding by both parties, thus making the event legal.

You can serve your notice in ANY Civil Registration Office in the Republic of Ireland regardless of where the marriage is taking place in the State

You can marry in the Republic of Ireland in a Religious, Civil or Secular Ceremony.

Religious marriage ceremonies can take place in a Church/Mosque/

Synagogue/Temple OR a building designated by the Religious body/order as suitable for religious worship. Religious marriage ceremonies cover a wide range of religious and spiritual beliefs and groups who can marry you in a venue of your choice or at an outdoors location.

Secular marriage ceremonies are non religious and were introduced in Ireland in 2013 and are conducted by the Humanist Association of Ireland

Civil Marriages are officiated by a HSE Civil Registrar and can take place in a Registry Office, with one Registry Office usually located in each county, OR in a venue of your own choice; however the venue must be open to the public.

If you wish to get married in a Religious or Secular ceremony you can book your appointment to serve your 3 months notice on the HSE’s online booking system here: Marriage Appointments (www.crsappointments.ie)

If you wish to marry in a Civil Ceremony in a Registry Office or Venue you can use the above site to make a provisional booking and your Registry Office of choice will ring you back to confirm your booking.

If you wish to marry civilly in Dublin city or county you should contact the Dublin Civil Registration Office at 01-8638200 to make your booking.

My Marriage was not registered?

If you are getting married civilly in a Registry Office or a Venue by a HSE Marriage Registrar they will register your marriage for you after the ceremony and you can apply online for your marriage certificate from our site here.

If you were married by a Religious, Spiritual or Humanist Celebrant you must return the two-page Marriage Registration Form you signed on the day of your wedding to any Civil Registration Office in the Republic of Ireland and the staff on duty will register your marriage. There is no deadline to registering a marriage but it is strongly advised that you register the marriage within four weeks of the wedding to avoid loss of the Marriage Registration Form.

How to correct an error on a Marriage Certificate?

If you find an error on your marriage certificate you can apply to correct the error by completing an application form from your local Civil Registration Office and submitting it to that office with accompanying documentary evidence to prove the error. Upon approval from the Regional Superintendent Registrar the local office will issue you with a corrected marriage certificate.

How do I apply for the Late Registration of a Marriage?

If you apply for your marriage certificate and no marriage record can be located you will need to apply for the late registration of your marriage if you had a legally valid marriage. The process depends when you were married:

If you applied to get married BEFORE the 6 November 2007 you will need to apply for a "Reconstituted Marriage".

Unlike the late registration of Births or Deaths, you will need to apply to the Civil Registration Office in the area you married in to apply for this.

The office will supply you with a FORM A which must be completed by the Parish you married in, and signed by the bride and groom, the priest who performed the ceremony and the two witnesses who co-signed the original licence. This will need to be submitted with the parish's own Religious Marriage Certificate and a letter from the parish confirming the details of the wedding to the Civil Registration Office in the area you married in - who in turn will submit the application to the General Register's Office for permission to register the marriage.

If you applied to get  married AFTER 6 November 2007 you will need to applied for LOST/OR DAMAGED MRF

Your local Civil Registration Office will issue you with the appropriate application forms that both parties to the marriage should complete and sign in the presence of a Solicitor, a Peace Commissioner or a Commissioner of Oaths.

The completed form should be submitted along with a letter/certificate from the Solemniser who married you confirming the details of the wedding to the Civil Registration Office in the area you married in.

The application will be submitted to the General Register' Office who in turn will give authority to the CRO to re-issue a Marriage Registration Form to the marriage couple. This form should then be signed by the both parties to the wedding, the Marriage Solemniser and the two witnesses who were present on the wedding day.

Once this signed form is delivered to any Civil Registration Office they will register the marriage and issue any required marriage certificates.

Where do I get a Letter of Freedom?

If you are getting married legally outside Ireland the government body that deals with marriages in that country may require the parties to the marriage to obtain a civil letter of freedom from the Irish government. You can apply online for this document from the website of the Irish Dept of Foreign Affairs.

For religious weddings in the Republic of Ireland you may be asked to obtain a Letter of Freedom to marry in a parish outside your own. This is a religious document and is issued by the Parish Office for the parish you were baptised in.

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Civil Certificates Ltd do not record or have access to your credit or debit card details. Nor will we ever email or call you about your card details.

 

We also offer STRIPE as a payment method for orders by our customers. Here is how Stripe describes its service:

Stripe is the best way to accept payments online. Stripe aims to expand internet commerce by making it easy to process transactions and manage an online business. We want to increase the GDP of the internet.

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We believe that enabling more transactions is a problem rooted in code and design, not finance. Stripe is built for developers, makers, and creators.

Backstory

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Public launches to public companies

Stripe now processes billions of dollars a year for thousands of businesses, from newly-launched start-ups to Fortune 500 companies. Since Stripe powers so many new businesses, it's a snapshot of how the internet is changing; many users are in categories that barely existed five years ago. Web and mobile businesses around the world using Stripe include Twitter, Kickstarter, Shopify, Salesforce, Lyft, and many more.

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I don't have a Credit Card, how can I buy a Certificate?

We understand that not everyone has a Credit Card or has access to someone that does. You can apply for your Certificate by post and pay using a Cheque / Money order.


Just follow the instructions in our Q & A Centre.

Births
How to order your Irish Birth Certificate by Post

Deaths
How to order your Irish Death Certificate by Post

Marriages
How to order your Irish Marriages Certificate by Post

Unfortunately this method takes longer than our online service. We have to wait for your payment to arrive and may even have to wait for your cheque to clear. 

On average these orders are dispatched within 14 days.

 

Postal Applications

How do I apply for a Certificate by post?

You can apply by post for an Adoption, Birth, Death, Marriage Certificate by downloading and completing the application form. See Births Death or Marriage section in our Q & A Centre.

Each application should be accompanied with a Euro Bank Cheque or Postal Order made payable to: CIVIL CERTIFICATATES LIMITED.

Post to: Civil Certificates Ltd, 6 - 9 Trinity Street, Dublin 2.

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How safe is your site?

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All data entered through our Contact Us, Adoption Certificate, Birth Certificate, Marriage Certificate and Death Certificate forms will remain confidential. We will not give your details to third parties without your written consent.

The information you provide will be held in accordance with the Data Protection Acts 1988 and 2003.

If you volunteer personal information in an e-mail or as an e-mail address in the form of an enquiry or comment the data will not be made available to any third party and will be used solely for the purpose for which it was intended.

Our Internet Service Provider collects technical details of site visits such as:

  • The IP address of the visitor’s web client.
  • The top-level domain name used (for example .i.e., .com, .org, .net).
  • The previous website address from which the visitor reached us, including any search terms used.
  • Clickstream data which shows the traffic of visitors around this web site (for example pages accessed and documents downloaded).
  • The type of web browser used by the website visitor

This information is for statistical purposes only and none of it will be used to identify individual site visitors unless required to do so by law.

Why is your website behind HTTPS?

A secure website address will always:

  • begin with ‘https://’, not ‘http://’
  • display the image of a closed padlock (usually in the top left corner of your browser window).

https is an online safety protocol that encrypts information so that data can be kept private and protected. In most cases, the text in the URL is preceded by a padlock symbol (if this is missing, the website should be treated with caution).

The ‘s’ in https incidentally, stands for secure. Websites that use https are safe because they utilise SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) to encrypt any information that is distributed online, such as your credit card details.

Our entire website is behind https. We encrypt your data before we send it to our Credit Card companies. This encryption prevents anyone from deciphering your details.

 

What Are Cookies?

Cookies are small files stored on your computer, tablet or mobile phone when you visit a website. When you return to our website we may retrieve these cookies from your web browser (e.g. Internet Explorer, Mozilla Firefox or Google Chrome) each time you visit, so we can remember your personal settings and improved your online experience. So cookies help to make your online experience as smooth as possible. For security reasons, many websites will not function at all without the use of cookies.

We have always used cookies to provide a secure and efficient website experience for our customers. As part of a recent changes in legislation, all websites are now required to provide additional information on what cookies are, and how and why they are used. These changes will not affect the way in which you currently use our website, however - as we can only provide certain features of this website through the use of cookies - by using our site you agree to the use of cookies as described in this policy.

What Cookies Are Used on Your Site?

Civilcertificates.ie uses Google Analytics, a web analytics service provided by Google, Inc. ("Google").

This service uses "cookies", which are text files placed on your computer, to help the website analyse how visitors to www.CIVILCERTIFICATES.IE use the site.

The information generated by the cookie about your use of the website (including your IP address) will be transmitted to and stored by Google on servers in the United States. Google will use this information for the purpose of evaluating your use of the website, compiling reports on website activity for Civil Certificates Ltd., and providing other services relating to website activity and internet usage.

Google may also transfer this information to third parties where required to do so by law, or where such third parties process the information on Google's behalf. Google will not associate your IP address with any other data held by Google. You may refuse the use of cookies by selecting the appropriate settings on your browser, however please note that if you do this you may not be able to use the full functionality of this website.

By using this website and allowing cookies to remain enabled, you consent to the processing of data about you by Google in the manner and for the purposes as set out above.

You will see two cookies for Google Analytics. _ga cookie lasts 2 years and is used to distinguish users. _gat cookie lives for 10 minutes and is used to throttle request rate. The only other cookie we use is a compliance cookie to show that you agree to our cookie policy by using our website.

Stillbirths

How to Register a StillBirth?

A stillbirth birth is any baby delivered stillborn who weighted a minimum of 500 grams OR had a gestational age of 24 weeks.

To register a Stillbirth that occurred BEFORE 1 January 1995, a parent of the child, or an older sibling or a family member can attend a local Civil Registration Office with current picture ID for themselves and a letter from the Hospital/Nursing Home or Institute where the stillbirth was delivered detailing the details of the birth (e.g. date of stillbirth, parent's details etc). The Registrar will register the Stillbirth and issue any stillbirth certificates that are required.

Stillbirths that occurred after the 1 January 1995 where registered by a parent or family member. However if after 12 months the stillbirth was not registered by a parent as they felt unable too, a staff member from the Hospital where the stillbirth was delivered is legally obliged to register the stillbirth.